Specials
Report on Shemaroo

Pre-school kids content’s monetisation and viewership challenges

Debate on whether there should be viewership cut for the youngest audience.

https://www.indiantelevision.com/sites/default/files/styles/smartcrop_800x800/public/images/tv-images/2019/03/18/dora-the-explorer.jpg?itok=pOwrIeJj

MUMBAI: Animators have long contemplated the complexity of producing pre-school content for the ages of two to four years. On the third day of FICCI Frames 2019, executives from the industry spoke about ‘Catching youngest viewers: Powering the kids network and advertisers ecosystem through data’. It had panellists BARC India senior VP business development partnerships Elbert D’silva, Sony Yay head programming Ronojoy Chakraborty, DDB Mudra Group executive director Sathyamurthy Namakkal, GroupM business head entertainment, sports and live events Vinit Karnik, Viacom18 head content kids TV network Anu Sikka and Graphiti multimedia co-founder Mujal Shroff. The session was moderated by Punaryug Artvision founder Ashish Kulkarni.

Sikka threw the limelight over the issue that the industry had been facing since the start and the reason why the kids genre is under-indexed. She said that at first it was a question of finance and so the industry depended on acquired content and later realised the need to produce home-grown content. Parents also exert some control over what the kid watches. A kid may have no issue with Dora being Indian or not, but it is the parents who demand local content. They would want their kids to watch localised content. “Kids from age five demand local content, but in case of kids from the age group of 0-2, the parents are the gatekeepers,” she concluded.  

She further added that now is the time that we need to cater to specialised content. “If you look at our Nick Jr. channel, it has grown three to four times this year. But unfortunately, if you look at the overall programming, we don’t get viewership of the two to fourteen years age group. And that is why there is a lack of pre-schooling content,” she said.

On the other hand, Shroff said that there is also a placement issue. He said, “If you look at the viewing pattern, as the child evolves these days, it is on multiple devices. But some age groups still prefer TV.” Kids aged 5-6 or 9-10 tend to consume content on their parents mobile phones or any other device but a 2-year-old kid still watches TV.

Chakraborty explained that pre-school programming is only justified if it can be monetised. “If you look at our category, one-fourth share is GECs but the revenue share for kids category is one-tenth. Hence the revenue here is very less and therefore, broadcasters are not creating content,” he said. If BARC were to provide some viewership cuts for the pre-school audience rather than keep it as a part of the entire kids genre, broadcasters will be able to curate better content.

Agreeing with him, Karnik said that it would be difficult to strategise programming for the pre-schooling kids as the category as a whole is under-indexed in terms of advertising. Despite witnessing a hike in ratings, revenues are increasing at a snail’s pace.

Namakkal chipped in with a different standpoint. He said that the industry shouldn’t get greedy about data because there is already information overload. “One-third of kids consume one and a half hours of video on TV screens. But while we talk about advertising revenue, it will never be equal to viewership share,” he explained.

Latest Reads

https://www.indiantelevision.com/sites/default/files/styles/340x340/public/images/tv-images/2021/03/09/ww100.jpg?itok=IDS-eNYz
Wonder Women 100: Mindset needs to change first for more inclusion, diversity

Women are increasingly coming out and taking up more challenging roles against all odds. The media, entertainment and advertising industry is no exception. Despite the great strides made over recent years, there are still issues like fewer women leaders in upper management positions and salary gaps...

Specials Event Coverage Occasions
https://www.indiantelevision.com/sites/default/files/styles/340x340/public/images/tv-images/2021/03/08/wonder.jpg?itok=Ll_P5ptL
The Wonder Women are here: Honouring 100 women leaders from M&E, ad & marketing

MUMBAI: Many a successful organisation in India's media, advertising, marketing and entertainment ecosphere have women leaders in key management and ownership positions. Where once women were assigned jobs related to programming or ad sales or media – and mostly at the middle management level –...

Specials Event Coverage Occasions
https://www.indiantelevision.com/sites/default/files/styles/340x340/public/images/tv-images/2021/03/08/ww100.jpg?itok=tkjecVyN
International Women's Day: 'Wonder Women 100' list to be unveiled today

Women have made tremendous strides over the years to achieve equal representation in the workplace. Many have broken the glass ceiling and risen to the top despite all odds. This International Women’s Day, Indiantelevision.com will recognise 100 such talented and outstanding women executives and...

Specials Event Coverage Occasions
https://www.indiantelevision.com/sites/default/files/styles/340x340/public/images/tv-images/2021/02/02/budget-21.jpg?itok=665EJAaK
Silver lining of #Budget2021: M&E industry hopes for ad spend growth

KOLKATA: Tax reliefs, lower customs duty, input tax credits, better scope for foreign direct investment (FDI) were among the many hopes that the media and entertainment industry had pegged on a budget “like never before.” But the pandemic-hit industry has not received any specific supportive...

Specials Forecast
https://www.indiantelevision.com/sites/default/files/styles/340x340/public/images/tv-images/2021/01/25/stream.jpg?itok=0NHtrR1u
Vidnet 2021: On innovation & creating disruptive content on OTTs

The rise of streaming platforms like Netflix, Disney+ Hotstar, Amazon Prime Video, Voot, Zee5, MXPlayer and ALT Balaji has allowed Indians to watch diverse content from around the globe along with experiencing new genres.

Specials Event Coverage VidNet
https://www.indiantelevision.com/sites/default/files/styles/340x340/public/images/tv-images/2021/01/19/pg.jpg?itok=aMyd8rFz
#Forecast2021: Rural consumption to rule the roost, says Parle’s Krishnarao Buddha

In 2020, marketers learnt to grapple with unforeseen challenges elicited by the lockdown, and they are prepared to handle such circumstances, incase of another such instance in the future (hopefully not).

Specials Forecast
https://www.indiantelevision.com/sites/default/files/styles/340x340/public/images/tv-images/2021/01/19/dth.jpg?itok=2ugzTNO1
#Forecast2021: Positivity returns slowly for cable, DTH operators

Waking up to a new pricing regime, followed by an unprecedented pandemic, natural disasters, and tensions with China, 2020 turned out to be a gloomy year for the cable TV distribution industry.

Specials Forecast
https://www.indiantelevision.com/sites/default/files/styles/340x340/public/images/tv-images/2021/01/18/tv.jpg?itok=a8_bbj0B
#Forecast2021: TV advertising may see biggest growth in five years

Indian television made a round trip to hell over the course of 2020, but the new year seems like the beginning of a positive era for the industry, as far as its stature as the primary advertising medium is concerned.

Specials Forecast
https://www.indiantelevision.com/sites/default/files/styles/340x340/public/images/tv-images/2021/01/16/production.jpg?itok=H82e5yTn
#Throwback2020: The year of reinvention in production

MUMBAI: The Covid2019 crisis has engendered a paradigm shift across all walks of life and it is believed that there’s no going back to “normalcy” even after the deadly virus is dealt with. This also holds true for the media and entertainment industry.

Specials Year Enders

Sign up for our Newsletter

subscribe for latest stories

* indicates required