Specials

Guest Column: Measure by Measure

http://www.indiantelevision.com/sites/drupal7.indiantelevision.co.in/files/styles/smartcrop_800x800/public/images/tv-images/2017/12/19/map.jpg?itok=1bFUgl_L

Year ends are always a good a time to reflect on the past, take stock of the present and plan for the future. So let me begin, by reflecting on the year that was.  

In 2016, the state of audience measurement in India grew by leaps and bounds. From just 10,000 homes in the previous system, we are already at 22,000 homes, with the course set for 55,000 as mandated. Over the year, the broadcast industry got a better idea of ‘What India Really Watches’, thanks to the addition of rural viewership measurement which BARC introduced– a fact that has been applauded by all. In fact, BARC’s investment in technology has ensured greater robustness in the system, with more automation and less manual interventions. Our system is also very scalable as our Bar-o-meter costs less than US$400 compared to the previously used meters which cost US$2500!

The watermarking technology adopted by BARC, is two generations ahead of the rest. It not only captures catch up TV but also simulcast. What this means is that BARC can monitor any recording of a programme, seen within seven days of its telecast, and can also accurately measure a simultaneous telecast of a cricket match across say 20 channels, including Doordarshan, and can report which channel is drawing the highest eyeballs. In fact, the watermarking technology is also future-ready which can be used for digital measurement, which BARC currently is evaluating.

Taking stock of the present, we at BARC are immensely proud of the credibility we have established and the trust that we have earned from the industry. This has come about as a result of support of our stakeholders and our commitment to transparency. Incidentally, the need for transparency was also the one big reason industry came together and formed BARC. It propelled the need for the formation of a joint industry body, where all stakeholders’ representatives are part of the board and the technical committee. A unique aspect of that is BARCs governance structure which ensures that decisions must necessarily be agreed to jointly. To further strengthen transparency and credibility, BARC has partnered with Ernst & Young (E&Y) so that data can be audited by an external independent auditor. Evidence enough to the seriousness of thought that was given to credible data by the three industry bodies which make up BARC.

Having established credibility in our data and systems, our task for the year ahead on that front is cut out: we will leave no stone unturned in our endeavour to maintain integrity, and take every step possible to ensure a robust and reliable viewership measurement environment: which is essential for the broadcast industry to thrive and grow. The support of our Board validates the faith we have in our systems and processes, and we will continue to build on that. We have set up a vigilance team that works with specialist agencies on the ground to track mala-fide activities. Any attempt to unfairly influence our measurement system has been dealt with firmly and we will continue to maintain zero-tolerance towards any acts of infiltration or tampering of our panel homes.

The TV Industry draws in multiple crores of rupees worth of advertising in a country with over 153.5 million TV homes, where watching TV firmly remains a family routine. Be it entertainment or news, sports or movies, music, kids shows or a national events like Independence and Republic Days, TV will continue to take centre stage in the lives of Indians. And monitoring who is watching what will continue to remain a critical need for the growing stakeholders.

While welcoming 2017, we at BARC, promise to continue our commitment to a transparent and credible viewership measurement system, because that’s the only way we know to measure things.

public://Parth.jpg The author of this article is Broadcast Audience Research Council India CEO. You can follow him on Twitter @parthodasgupta. The views expressed are personal and Indiantelevision.com need not necessarily subscribe to them

Latest Reads

http://www.indiantelevision.com/sites/drupal7.indiantelevision.co.in/files/styles/340x340/public/images/tv-images/2018/01/17/trai.jpg?itok=jzQOdvgy
2017 was a regulatory roller coaster and the ride continues

NEW DELHI: The year 2017 for the media industry certainly couldn’t be called easy from the point of doing business despite efforts and claims by the federal government that significant progress had been made in the regard.

Specials Year Enders
http://www.indiantelevision.com/sites/drupal7.indiantelevision.co.in/files/styles/340x340/public/images/tv-images/2018/01/13/chetan.jpg?itok=kCNjx_ye
Guest column: Digital outlook for 2018

MUMBAI: The year 2017 is behind us and, as we peek into 2018, there is so much to look forward to. The digital landscape is so dynamic and ever-evolving that an annual trend-spotting article would be unfair. But still there are key areas where digital is heading and I can safely say that 2018 is...

Specials Year Enders
http://www.indiantelevision.com/sites/drupal7.indiantelevision.co.in/files/styles/340x340/public/images/tv-images/2018/01/11/content.jpg?itok=_9GC25n5
Content segmentation defines English entertainment, movies in 2017

MUMBAI: It was the year of HD for English entertainment in India. Add to it, the bump up in the number of movie premieres and series that you could now see in better quality. Increased adoption of HD set top boxes encouraged broadcasters to go for HD. Content segmentation has emerged as a big...

Specials Year Enders
http://www.indiantelevision.com/sites/drupal7.indiantelevision.co.in/files/styles/340x340/public/images/tv-images/2018/01/11/dth.jpg?itok=QkzMsFlZ
DTH's year of consolidation

MUMBAI: It would be safe to say that this was the year of the big DTH challenge. India’s cable TV multi system operators (MSOs) could not go into many phase IV areas and DTH stepped in wherever analogue broadcast signals were switched off following the crossing of the digital addressable system (...

Specials Year Enders
http://www.indiantelevision.com/sites/drupal7.indiantelevision.co.in/files/styles/340x340/public/images/tv-images/2018/01/09/year.jpg?itok=Qc8RGGh9
2017 a year of rebranding and extending time slots for Hindi GECs

MUMBAI: The year 2017 was a roller-coaster ride for Hindi general entertainment channels (GEC) in the truest spirit of the term. The tussle for the top slot in the Broadcast Audience Research Council (BARC) ratings has seen pay TV and free-to-air (FTA) channels hold on tight to the rope.

Specials Year Enders
http://www.indiantelevision.com/sites/drupal7.indiantelevision.co.in/files/styles/340x340/public/images/tv-images/2018/01/09/Untitled-1.jpg?itok=bmTRbT_m
The year of hiccups for marketers

MUMBAI: The year 2017 was when brands were unwillingly thrown into a roller-coaster ride only to emerge dizzy and faint. The highs weren’t enough to ride out the lows.

Specials Year Enders
http://www.indiantelevision.com/sites/drupal7.indiantelevision.co.in/files/styles/340x340/public/images/tv-images/2018/01/04/ear.jpg?itok=jT2Q8mKD
2017: The year OTTs went regional in India

MUMBAI: Over-the-top (OTT) services were undoubtedly the centre of attraction in 2017. The boom in India’s internet users, mainly aided by the growth of Reliance Jio, ensured that OTT players got the right reception and target audience. Not just  mainstream TV broadcasters but even smaller players...

Specials Year Enders
http://www.indiantelevision.com/sites/drupal7.indiantelevision.co.in/files/styles/340x340/public/images/tv-images/2018/01/03/year.jpg?itok=SbrfiYTZ
Making the news: A look at what news broadcasters did in 2017

MUMBAI: News channels were thrown into a storm of activity in 2017 with each player keeping up its oars to wade out of challenges that hit at them like ten-foot waves. With elections and sensational news driving up viewership at various points throughout the year, English news channels had to...

Specials Year Enders
http://www.indiantelevision.com/sites/drupal7.indiantelevision.co.in/files/styles/340x340/public/images/tv-images/2017/12/30/Sahil-Shah1.jpg?itok=weZUchlK
Guest Column: The comeback of full-service agencies in India

By 2020, we will be close to a billion digitised screens. With the advent of cheaper data and smartphones and by virtue of tech giants such as Google, Facebook and Amazon entering the grassroots of India, digitisation has become inevitable. And it’s going to be mobile plus digitised television (...

Specials Year Enders

Latest News

Load More

Sign up for our Newsletter

subscribe for latest stories